Who Is Author & Publisher Racquel Williams ?

Racquel Williams recently appeared on the Whos Who In African American Literature Blog Talk Radio hosted by Jeff Gatsby Wilson for a very indepth interview about her life and writing career. The Jamaican born resident who was raised in Mt. Vernon.NY  but recently relocated to Atlanta.GA has made quite a name for herself in the Litertary Industry the past few years.

12249632_916060538449113_8514607699448740325_n

During the interview Racquel was open and honest about her past, the struggles she had staying on the right side of the law and spending time in federal prison. It was an experience that she was not proud of but acknowledged that it changed her life and made her the determined, successful businesswoman and author she is today.

12139963_911968882191612_2490348380301687504_o

After a career that has seen her working with several publishers and failed attempt at self publishing she has finally found her way in the literary industry. “Racquel Williams Presents” is her current publishing imprint and it is doing very well. Racquel & RWP have changed the game with their line of books as well as a roster with over 15 successful authors who are proving to be very talented.

pizap.com14505385559311

*To hear what Racquel Williams has to say about her future plans for 2016 and the book deal she has with Author/ Publisher & Movie Producer Carl Weber check out the complete WWIAAL Blog Talk Radio interview with Jeff Gatsby Wilson at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/DJGatsby

dec 23 blog 2

Advertisements

The Kwanzaa “Celebration” honoring the values of ancient African cultures

Kwanzaa

Honoring the values of ancient African cultures

by Holly Hartman

kwanzaa

Related Links

Other African-American Holidays

The year 2015 will see the 49th annual Kwanzaa, the African American holiday celebrated from December 26 to January 1. It is estimated that some 18 million African Americans take part in Kwanzaa.

Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, nor is it meant to replace Christmas. It was created by Dr. Maulana “Ron” Karenga, a professor of Black Studies, in 1966. At this time of great social change for African Americans, Karenga sought to design a celebration that would honor the values of ancient African cultures and inspire African Americans who were working for progress.

Kwanzaa is based on the year-end harvest festivals that have taken place throughout Africa for thousands of years. The name comes from the Swahili phrase “matunda ya kwanza,” which means “first fruits of the harvest.” Karenga chose a phrase from Swahili because the language is used by various peoples throughout Africa.

The 7 Seven Principles (Nguzo Saba)

images (26)Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa honors a different principle. These principles are believed to have been key to building strong, productive families and communities in Africa. During Kwanzaa, celebrants greet each other with “Habari gani,” or “What’s the news?” The principles of Kwanzaa form the answers.

The Principles of Kwanzaa

umoja (oo-MOH-ja)
Meaning: unity
Action: building a community that holds together

kujichagulia (koo-jee-cha-goo-LEE-yah)
Meaning: self-determination
Action: speaking for yourself and making choices that benefit the community

ujima (oo-JEE-mah)
Meaning: collective work and responsibility
Action: helping others within the community

ujamaa (oo-JAH-ma)
Meaning: cooperative economics
Action: supporting businesses that care about the community

nia (nee-AH)
Meaning: a sense of purpose
Action: setting goals that benefit the community

kuumba (koo-OOM-bah)
Meaning: creativity
Action: making the community better and more beautiful

imani (ee-MAH-nee)
Meaning: faith
Action: believing that a better world can be created for communities now and in the future

Colorful Celebrations

images (23)Families gather for the great feast of karamu on December 31. Karamu may be held at a home, community center, or church. Celebrants enjoy traditional African dishes as well as those featuring ingredients Africans brought to the United States, such as sesame seeds (benne), peanuts (groundnuts), sweet potatoes, collard greens, and spicy sauces.

Especially at karamu, Kwanzaa is celebrated with red, black, and green. These three colors were important symbols in ancient Africa that gained new recognition through the efforts of Marcus Garvey’s Black Nationalist movement. Green is for the fertile land of Africa; black is for the color of the people; and red is the for the blood that is shed in the struggle for freedom.

The Seven Symbols

Celebrants decorate with red, black, and green as well as African-style textiles and art. At the heart of Kwanzaa imagery, however, are the seven symbols.

The Seven Symbols of Kwanzaa

kikombe cha umoja
Meaning: the unity cup
Action: Celebrants drink from this cup in honor of their African ancestors. Before drinking, each person says “harambee,” or “let’s pull together.”

kinara
Meaning: the candleholder, which holds seven candles
Action: It said to symbolize stalks of corn that branch off to form new stalks, much as the human family is created.

mazao
Meaning: fruits, nuts, and vegetables
Action: These remind celebrants of the harvest fruits that nourished the people of Africa.

mishumaa saba
Meaning: the seven candles that represent the seven principles
Action: A different candle is lit each day. Three candles on the left are green; three on the right are red; and in the middle is a black candle.

mkeka
Meaning: mat
Action: The symbols of Kwanzaa are arranged on the mkeka, which may be made of straw or African cloth. It symbolizes the foundation upon which communities are built.

vibunzi (plural, muhindi)
Meaning: ear of corn
Action: Traditionally, one ear of corn is placed on the mkeka for each child present.

zawadi
Meaning: gifts
Action: Traditionally, educational and cultural gifts are given to children on January 1, the last day of Kwanzaa.

DJGBC December 2015 Book Of The Month: Angelica’s Box by The Greatest Post Alive

Awardwinning Author / Poet and Actor James Gordon a/k/a The Greatest Poet Alive a/k/a/ BoBo a/k/a PIZZLE is back with what may be his most interesting book to date.

Angelica’s Box: A Poetically Sober Psychotic Break (Pizzle’s Trilogy of Insanity)

 

gpa 2015 4

There comes a moment when it all makes sense because you change perspective. You encounter so many women that you understand that they are different, and you have to treat them differently. That sounds simple, but as a man, you don’t get it right off. Not saying I do now, but my comprehension of the estrogen species has improved. These poems, of various forms and themes, stem from my interactions with women in all walks of my life. Do your best to be objective. After all, I’m a man.

GET IT AT AMAZON.COM

http://www.amazon.com/Angelicas-Box-Poetically-Psychotic-Insanity-ebook/dp/B017J2QIB6/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1449581584&sr=1-1

Happy Holidays Buy,Read & Review

Holiday Promo & Graphics by

Jeff Gatsby Wilson & The WB Media Group (WBMG).

*Whos promoting you and your books ? ‪#‎TeamGatsby‬‪ #‎HappyHolidays‬

christmas 2015 2
Celia Laratte, Wahida Clark, Elva Nelson Hayes, Nicety, Fabiola Joseph, K’WAN, Leondra LeRae, Kennedee Devoe

 Happy Holidays Buy,Read & Review

christmas 2015 1
James Gordon, Tumeki Griffin, LaDonna Marie, Joy Elan, Madlen Namro, Sonovia Alexander, Ben Burgess Jr. Kottyn Campbell

Happy Holidays Buy,Read & Review

christmas 2015
Nigeria Lockley, Angie Daniels, Khalil Hakim, Sonovia Alexander,             Edith Nevis, Joy Elan,  Brenda Stokes Lee, George Naim Cash

For information on book promo and other advertising services visit http://www.wbmediagroup.webs.com or http://www.whoswhoinafricanamericanliterature.com